Derek Chauvin, former Minneapolis Police Officer, was found guilty of all charges in the May 2020 death of George Floyd. Those charges were second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. Like many Alabamians, I feel like justice has been served.

We know the outcome now. However, I’ll be honest I’ve been very concerned and borderline tense the whole day awaiting the verdict announcement. Once the verdict was released, I broke into the show to alert our listeners.

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I know how I feel about the entire George Floyd situation. I can’t imagine what his family and friends were going through today. One could only assume a variety of emotions. According to CNN, Philonise Floyd told reporters that "Today, we are able to breathe again.”

I’m not family nor a friend of George Floyd, but one of the millions of people that watched the video of his last breaths. I’ll be honest it took me several hours to process the feelings I have about the entire situation.

I hope that the discussion about police accountability continues not only in the United States but in West Alabama too. Today, listeners told me that they were “overjoyed” at the verdict. One gentleman said, “He knew he was going to be found guilty,” and one woman just simply asked, “what’s next for Chauvin?”

Here is what is next, sentencing.

We know that Chauvin was taken into custody immediately and that sentencing will occur in roughly eight weeks. According to CNN, “Chauvin faces up to 40 years in prison for second-degree murder, up to 25 years for third-degree murder and up to 10 years for second-degree manslaughter.”

(Source) Click here for more information from CNN.

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