This morning, I came across an article which stated that Natural Bridge Park in Haleyville, AL is for sale. Apparently, the family which owns it is not in a position to run the park right now. Full story.

So, quite naturally, this led me to check out what I thought was the website for the park.  I’m a huge fan of weekend trips.  Anyplace where it takes five hours or less to drive and arrive, I’m in!

It actually ended up being the website for the Alabama Mountain Lakes Tourist Association. Let me tell you, the website is one of the most well-organized for tourists.  It lists places to stay (outside of hotels) and area restaurants, which is important to me.  When I travel, I like to eat at places we don’t have at home. Chain restaurants are almost always a last resort.

Well, after I visit the website, I decide to look for it on a map to see in what direction I would be traveling if I decided to visit.

I pull up the map, and there are dozens upon dozens of other cities and towns on it.  I don’t know why, but this one particular city caught my eye: Selmer.

(Credit: Google Maps)

As soon as I saw it, I said, “What is this? Selma’s more sophisticated cousin?”

This is how my mind works ALL DAY! Nothing can ever be left alone. I had to look up both cities’ dates of incorporation.

Selma, Alabama is said to have been settled in 1815 and incorporated in 1820.  And the date for Selmer, Tennessee? 1901!

Eureka! (Yes, that’s how I talk inside my head. Overlook that part.)

Just as I was about to let it go and just move on, something else caught my eye.  It was a line that read as follows:

Named for       Selma, Alabama

Check it out.

Now see, here I was playing about Selmer being a more sophisticated cousin of Selma and it turns out that’s EXACTLY what it was! *tickled*

So, just add an “E-R” and it makes the word prop-ER, huh?

I think I went so far into this thing because I hear it so much in my everyday life.  People convert words which end in “A” to end in “E-R” for no godly reason. (To the contrary, words that end in "E-R" are often made to end with an "A" to create an informality.... And I WON'T be giving an example here.)

Actor and producer Tyler Perry made millions of dollars with his portrayal of the character Madea, who adds an “E-R” to everything! What makes the character so relatable is that we all know or have heard stories of people who are very similar to the character.

I’ve even heard someone say “Mommer.” Mommer? What the heck is a Mommer.  If “Momma” is too casual, just cut it off at Mom. But Mommer?

Y’all running out!

(I had to type it like I felt it.)

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

Stay at the Lake Tuscaloosa House That Inspired ‘Sweet Home Alabama’