As an unstable air mass enters Alabama will bring along the potential for storms. Some of these storms could be strong and even severe. As always, I highly recommend that you stay weather aware as details of this system could change due to various circumstances.

The National Weather Service in Birmingham has issued guidance for the next few days.

Friday

Our coverage areas are in the “slight risk” zone.

Area

All of Central Alabama

Timeline

10 am until Midnight

Main Threats

Damaging Winds up to 60 miles per hour

Hail up to a quarter size

 

Saturday

Our coverage areas are in the two various zones, which are “enhanced risk” and “slight risk” areas.

Area

All of Central Alabama

Timeline

Midnight to 1 pm

Main Threats – Enhanced Risk

Tornadoes

Damaging Winds up to 70 miles per hour

Hail up to a quarter size

Localized Flooding

Main Threats – Slight Risk

Tornadoes possible

Damaging Winds up to 60 miles per hour

Quarter size hail

Localized Flooding

Friday, April 9th and Saturday, April 10th

Now would be a great time to be sure you have multiple ways to receive warnings since some of the activity could take place in the overnight hours.  Also, don’t silence your phone when you go to bed Friday night. Be sure if you get an alert, it will wake you up.

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James Spann, ABC 33/40, and Townsquare Media Tuscaloosa Chief Meteorologist provided more insight into the probable severe weather set up for Friday and Saturday.

Friday

James Spann noted that “it will be much like a summer day... the storms will be "hit and miss," but where they form, they could produce strong winds and possibly some hail. There is no tornado threat tomorrow afternoon; the high will be in the mid to upper 70s.”

Saturday

He further commented that “a nasty line of severe storms is forecast to roll into Alabama after midnight tomorrow night, into Saturday morning.” He noted that the “storms will likely enter Northwest Alabama around 3:00–4:00 am Saturday and will move out of Southeast Alabama by 3:00 pm. For the northern half of the state, the rain will be over by mid to late morning, and the afternoon will be dry with a clearing sky.”

(Source) Click here for more from the National Weather Service in Birmingham. Click here for more from James Spann.

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